Sports Medicine

Sports Medicine

Our Sports Medicine Physicians specialize in the prevention, diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of sports injuries. Whether you are a weekend warrior, a high school competitor or a professional athlete, CAO’s Sports Medicine Physicians and their staff evaluate and diagnose sports injuries promptly and implement appropriate treatment, both surgically and non-surgically. Our end game is to quickly and safely return our patients to their chosen sport or activity. 

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  • Medial Ulnar Collateral Ligament Injury

    This condition is an injury to the medial ulnar collateral ligament, a ligament composed of three bands located on the inner side of the elbow. The MUCL connects the humerus to the ulna. Injury to the MUCL can cause pain, weakness and sometimes a feeling of instability in the arm.
  • Lateral Ankle Ligament Reconstruction

    This procedure is performed to correct chronic ankle instability that has not responded to treatment such as physical therapy. Ankle instability occurs when ligaments are stretched or torn. A simple repair, known as the Bröstrom-Gould technique, is ideal for athletes who need to retain full range of motion.
  • Rotator Cuff Injuries

    The rotator cuff is a group of muscles and tendons that cover the head of the humerus and hold it in the shoulder socket. When rotator cuff tendons become damaged, the shoulder can become stiff, sore or lose mobility. Injuries are often caused by direct damage, such as a traumatic fall or repetitive overhead motions. It can also develop because of indirect causes such as impingement or shoulder imbalance.
  • Hip Arthroscopy

    This outpatient procedure allows the physician to examine the cartilage, bones, ligaments and tendons of the hip for damage or disorders. The physician uses a small camera, called an arthroscope, which is inserted into the hip joint.
  • ACL Reconstruction

    This procedure replaces a damaged anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The ACL connects the front top of the tibia (the lower leg bone), to the rear bottom of the femur (the thigh bone).
  • Meniscus Repair

    The meniscus is a band of cartilage in the knee that acts as a shock absorber and provides stability to the knee joint. The meniscus helps protect the articular cartilage, the smooth covering on the ends of the femur and tibia. If a meniscus tears, it can often be repaired through arthroscopic surgery.
  • Arthroscopic Bankart Repair

    This arthroscopic procedure is used to repair a detached labrum. The labrum is a thick band of cartilage attached to the glenoid. It lines the shoulder socket and helps keep the ball of the humerus in place.
  • Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    This surgical procedure is used to inspect and reattach torn tendons in the shoulder's rotator cuff. The initial part of the surgery is performed arthroscopically through small tubes. In some cases, open surgery may be needed to repair large tears.
  • Mini-Open Rotator Cuff Repair

    This surgical procedure is used to inspect and reattach torn tendons in the shoulder's rotator cuff. The initial part of the surgery is performed arthroscopically through small tubes. An open incision may be needed if the damage is severe.
  • SLAP Repair

    This arthroscopic procedure is performed to repair a tear of the biceps tendon at the point where it connects to the labrum, a ring of cartilage that surrounds the shoulder socket. A tear at this point is called a SLAP (Superior Labrum Anterior-Posterior) tear. SLAP repair is performed under general and regional anesthesia, and patients usually leave the hospital the same day.